Tips to Minimize Mosquito Exposure in East Texas

How much water do you think a mosquito needs to lay eggs and create new mosquitoes? Does it take a gallon? Does it take a cup? We have bad news for you. It only takes a half a cup for a female mosquito to lay a hundred eggs in your yard. And she can do this over and over again if she is able to find a blood meal. Water is the key to protecting your East Texas yard from mosquitoes. The less stagnant water you have in your yard, the fewer mosquitoes you're going to have.

Remove Containers

When mosquitoes encroach upon your property, they will be looking for stagnant water sources as little as an inch deep. In these, they will lay their eggs. So, removing containers will remove breeding site options.

Anything in your yard that can hold rainwater is a container. It might be a toy left in the yard. It might be a lawnmower. It might be your gutters. You'll need to look high and low.

When you find a container, you'll have to assess whether or not it can be removed from your lawn. Toys can be stowed inside your home. Your lawnmower can be put in the shed or the garage. But your gutters are a different story. You'll have to get a very tall ladder and get up there to clean those gutter or hire someone to clean them for you. Most of the containers in your yard are going to be removable. So that is a good place to start.

Empty Out Containers

It takes a little over a week for a mosquito to go from egg to wiggler to tumbler and eventually adult. As an egg, a wiggler and a tumbler, those mosquitoes will remain in the water. It is only when they mature to adulthood that they take to the air. Therefore, emptying containers can prevent mosquitoes from developing. If you have a container that can't be removed from your yard, like a tire swing, you can prevent mosquitoes from breeding by emptying the water out weekly. Or, in the case of a tire swing, you can just poke a hole in it and give the water a way to get out and to the ground, where it will soak in and dry up.

Moisture

Once mosquitoes take to the air, they don't just fly away from your property. Mosquitoes are pretty lazy, especially Asian tiger mosquitoes, which are a serious vector for dangerous mosquito-borne viruses. Mosquitoes that hatch in your yard will hide in your yard (if they can). One way to make your yard less hospitable to mosquitoes is to keep things dry.

  • Trim tree branches to let the sunlight dry areas that get too much shade.

  • Water your plants in such a way that the ground doesn't become saturated.

  • Fix leaky spigots and hoses.

  • Refrain from leaving sprinklers on all the time.

If you remove breeding sites and dry your yard out, you can have an impact on mosquito populations. When mosquitoes venture into your yard, they won't find what they're looking for and they'll decide to go somewhere else. In some cases, this is enough to make a backyard a much nicer place to be--and a whole lot safer. But, the best way to control mosquitoes is by investing in seasonal mosquito service.

Hiring a professional to routinely spray your yard for mosquitoes has a powerful impact. It works to eliminate mosquitoes that are hiding in your vegetation and it leaves a residual that eliminates new mosquitoes that come in and rest in your yard. If a mosquito rests in your yard before laying her eggs, that could be 100 mosquitoes you stopped dead in their tracks!

If you've been on the fence about investing in professional mosquito control for your East Texas home, we want you to know that it works. Our customers come back year after year because they see results. Give it a shot and see what an amazing difference it can make. It's like getting your backyard back. Reach out to us today and schedule service. You'll be glad you did.

go to top